Wundervölker, Monstrosität und Hässlichkeit im Mittelalter (German Edition)

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Werther und die Liebe - Die Leiden des jungen Werther [Deutsch Hausarbeit]

I read Hyperion partly because I read his name many times and I didn't know why he is so influential. Now I know. Even if I read the translation rather than the German version of Hyperion, the ideas enclosed in it are interesting enough to ignore the loss in translation.

Hyperion oder Der Eremit in Griechenland

There is a falling silent, a forgetting of all existence, in which we feel as if we have lost everything, a night of our soul in which no glimmer of a star, not even a rotten piece of wood illuminates us. I had now become calm. Now nothing more drove me from bed at midnight. Now I no longer scorched myself in my own flame. I gazed out before me now, silent and solitary, and d "There is a forgetting of all existence, a falling silent of our being, in which we feel as if we have found everything. I gazed out before me now, silent and solitary, and did not let my eye wander into the past and the future.

Now far and near no longer pressed together in my mind; I did not see men when they did not force me to see them. I wanted to genuflect before its contextual grandeur and beauteous writing, the way it had penetrated every modicum of my being with its lexical beauty was almost so divine, and even with this said, I give it no just. It is truly a book of pure gratification. It felt like a saunter within a forest ceaselessly oscillating betwixt the summits of love and beatific rhapsody, and the nadirs of consuming dolour, heartache, forlornness, and painful nostalgia for Ancient Greece.

It spoke of the aching labefaction of idealism and romanticism. At times his wordy forest was verdurously green that you'd desire to be lost in its bliss for aye, at others it become grievously blue that you spiral with its character into a tumultuous mayhem of anguish and angst.

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It was indeed one of the most beautiful reads my eyes, mind, and soul had devoured with profound elation and glee, and ah, what a way to lose myself in a world of mesmeric prose other than in this book. Truly, an exquisitely marvelous and breathtaking work, and I was so fortuitous to know about it and share the jouissance of reading it, it gave me an indelible warmth. Oct 03, Andrew added it Shelves: pre-wwii-german-fiction , german-language-fiction. But Hyperion is somewhat different. It's a rather straightforward romantic novel, with its idealistic narrator, its epistolary style, its glorifications both of classical Greece and the then-current romantic-national ideal.

Maybe not one of the greats, but perfectly serviceable, and, if you're more of a romantic than my hardbitten prairie self, then you might truly love it. This book reflects my enourmous love for Ancient Greece and at times I caught myself thinking the same grand exclamations that Hyperion voices out. One of the books I wish I had written. Not a love story, not a war story; a bit of both - a story of truth, told in the manner of German Romantism which I love.

I reccomend this book to anyone who has a thing for beautifully put words and a burning love for the Ancient times. I'm sure lots of people do. This is mostly the kind of high-drama romantic self-absorbed and overblown narrative that I hate -- and I mostly hated it. It's actually written as a series of letters What I did like was that the 'introduction' was in the translator's postscript -- I so prefer reading about authors after I've encountered their work.

The postscript also reconciled me just a little--not to the content, but to Holderlin himself. I feel that in the shorter form of poetry, whe This is mostly the kind of high-drama romantic self-absorbed and overblown narrative that I hate -- and I mostly hated it. I feel that in the shorter form of poetry, where the undeniable beauty of some of his phrasing could shine without being enmeshed in a long outpouring of sameness that makes your eyes glaze over.

Particularly if I read German. I still find it a little hard to see what Nietszche liked about this book, or anyone. Holderlin's descent into madness, however, though unsurprising from the high-maintainence hyper-sensitivity and self-obsessions of the prose, made me feel a little guilty about my desire to slap all of the characters and the author himself. Of course, this guy was one of the inventors of romanticism.

From the vantage point of today I find him a stereotyped figure, but this was all new at the time, and it's interesting for the new and undeniably fresher views of god and religion and nature. But if you need a cure for using too many exclamation marks, this is for you: Oh heaven and earth! I cried, this is joy! With your glorious soul, O man! You will save my fatherland! From that day on we became ever holier and dearer to each other. Profound, indescribable seriousness had arisen between us. People like me will find it painful. This is from the bromance section, which was so explicit to my modern eyes I was quite sure and fairly surprised that he was so openly celebrating ancient Greece in all of its traditions.

I can't quite bring myself to believe that it was not read so at the time, even though apparently it wasn't, and the passionately rampant love he felt for Alabander was more of a metaphor than anything else. They sank to the ground in each other's arms and everything. It is also often unintentionally humorous: 'And should I taste at times like a crab apple to you, press me for as long as it takes until I am drinkable' As for the role of the poet: Like the ray of light you must descend; like the all-refreshing rain, you must go down into the land of mortality, you must illuminate like Apollo I implore you, go into Athens, one more time, and look at the men, too, who walk about there among the ruins, the coarse Albanian and the other good, childlike Greeks The Greeks and the Germans have a tense relationship at the present time, so it is good to be reminded that in the broader view there has always been a strong tradition of Hellenophilia amongst the Teutons.

This book is an example.


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  4. Hyperion oder Der Eremit in Griechenland by Friedrich Hölderlin (4 star ratings)?

Hyperion is a Greek, looking back at his attempts to liberate his homeland from the Turkish yoke, and at the course of his love affair with Diotima. Neither of these main themes have a happy ending, but there is plenty of poetic pathos in the reflecting. There is also The Greeks and the Germans have a tense relationship at the present time, so it is good to be reminded that in the broader view there has always been a strong tradition of Hellenophilia amongst the Teutons.

There is also a real power, and wistful pleasure, in the descriptions of rustic retreat. It reminded me of how some years ago I was sailing in the Aegean with my parents, and we passed close to a small uninhabited island on which perched the ruins of an abandoned hermitage. I remarked to my father that part of me would like to spend my life in such a place; he agreed. My mother thought us both insane.

This book is, in parts, moving and beautiful - but, sometimes, it doesn't quite ring true. The language, although poetic, is occasionally overblown; and the account of Hyperion's friend Alabanda is impossible to read nowadays without sniggering at its obvious homoeroticism - the joke being, of course, that it is only obvious to the contemporary reader or so I'm told - though sometimes it's hard to believe.

We are always aware of the multi layered nature of the text: Hyperion isn't really a Greek revolutionary, but a German Romantic's idea of what a Classical Greek would have been like if he was a 19th century Greek revolutionary And yet.. Who has not suffered in love? Who has not felt the consolations of close, comradely friendships? Who is not moved by the beauties of the natural world? Who cannot feel the deep joy of rural seclusion, and the Taoist sense of detachment from a world enthralled to the stupid, the greedy, and the vulgar? Hyperion, c'est moi. View 1 comment. Holderlin's Hyperion catapults eighteenth- century epistolarity into another dimension.

Holderlin transforms the sociability embodied by the epistolary form into a vision of fully delineated subjectivities in dialogue. What is most interesting is the novel's weird erotic push-and-pull, as Hyperion yo-yos between Alabanda and Diotima.

Die Leiden Des Jungen Werther, Softcover - AbeBooks

This sexual indeterminacy is in turn echoed by the narrative's postrevolutionary oscillation between intense lyrical introspection and strident depictions of politi Holderlin's Hyperion catapults eighteenth- century epistolarity into another dimension. This sexual indeterminacy is in turn echoed by the narrative's postrevolutionary oscillation between intense lyrical introspection and strident depictions of political commitment. Here is another counterintuitive example of a Jacobin novel that is simultaneously the highest of high romanticism Dec 31, Andreas rated it really liked it.

This will include a close reading of the texts in their original version , and lead to a critical discussion of crucial themes which emerge and the ways in which they are still relevant today. This module aims at illustrating the extent to which this affirmation is true, both from the subjective standpoint of the subjective perception of this most complex sentiment, and from the objective standpoint of a historical collocation.

Every age is marked by the historically rooted conditions in which its culture flourishes, thereby acquiring a new awareness and new models for intimate interpersonal relationships. Through the looking glass of literary representations of love we will attempt to show the transformations through which the Enlightenment, the "Empfindsamkeit", the "Sturm and Drang" movement, the "classical" period and the early Romanticism achieved their specific historical and cultural identity. Sigrid Damm, Insel- Taschenbuch , Frankfurt a.

Further bibliographical explanations and indications will be given during the course. In the oral all students will be required: 1 to be familiar with the chosen texts and to be able to translate into Italian a piece from one of those texts; 2 to be able to discuss the cultural and historical contexts of the works being examined; 3 to be conversant with the textual tools to be able first to comment on both the content and formal aspects, in order finally to present competently their own personal opinions; 4 to be able to make use of the critical tools of analysis when discussing the texts in the original; and 5 to present a case in German on a particular chosen subject from a selection first covered during the course.

Hyperion oder Der Eremit in Griechenland

Well, that's how I understood it. It was painful and tedious to read. Nevertheless, it is good to know that he was mates with Hegel and Schelling, so that explains why it felt a bit idealist. From the same period, I definitely prefer to read Rousseau or Voltaire. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Other editions. Enlarge cover. Error rating book. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem?

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Details if other :. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Seine Wirkung besonders auf die Literatur des Jahrhunderts ist einmalig. Get A Copy. Hardcover , pages. Published by Anaconda first published More Details Original Title. Other Editions Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

To ask other readers questions about Hyperion oder Der Eremit in Griechenland , please sign up. Be the first to ask a question about Hyperion oder Der Eremit in Griechenland. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Rating details. More filters. Sort order. I hesitates between two. Poetry of course. The fragile mentale child of Age of Enlightement or the giant hero of Resistance against nazi. The problem is traduction. In french, It's Philippe Jacottet a poet who translate Holderlin. It is a little too hermetic from my point of view. So I'm complain to learn german to have my own translation.

So Holderlin or Char? I take both. What a marvel, what a work of art! I read this novel slowly, relishing each letter in turn. It inspired me and moved me. Truly, a masterpiece! Food for thought for scholars, many books have been written about the Hyperion. It is the story of a young Greek dreamer, who wishes to liberate Greece from the oppressors and see Ancient Classic Greece come alive again.


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  • Linked to real historical events, the Turkish-Russian War in the Peloponnese. Hyperion participates in some battles. The author tells the story in form of letters written by Hyperion to his friend Bellarmin, with the exception of a few letters written to and from Diotima, his true love. Then he will meet Alabanda, a beautiful young man who takes a liking to Hyperion, liking that resembles very much an erring love between them. But soon that friendship breaks up.

    In Mai the next year Hyperion meets beautiful Diotima, and they fall deeply in love. However, as much as Hyperion loves her, he is carried away by his ambition to fight and liberate Greece. He meets up again with Alabanda, and they both join the ongoing Turkish-Russian war. There is no happy end in sight.

    Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

    The main characteristic of this novel is the extreme high level of language and vocabulary. Sometimes too much so, to my taste. A great reading experience however. View 2 comments. A German writing a love letter to greece? It was a different time all right. More than that it is a biographic tale about loss, love, romanticism etc.

    It mixes quite skilfully bildungsroman and epistolary writing, what were pretty much the fashionable writting gimmicks of its time. If you have a love for German Romantic literature and philosophy do give it a go. If you liked Goethe's Werther, you'll probably like this. I kept reading here and there that Holderlin influenced many philosophers and poets. I read Hyperion partly because I read his name many times and I didn't know why he is so influential. Now I know. Even if I read the translation rather than the German version of Hyperion, the ideas enclosed in it are interesting enough to ignore the loss in translation.

    There is a falling silent, a forgetting of all existence, in which we feel as if we have lost everything, a night of our soul in which no glimmer of a star, not even a rotten piece of wood illuminates us. I had now become calm. Now nothing more drove me from bed at midnight. Now I no longer scorched myself in my own flame. I gazed out before me now, silent and solitary, and d "There is a forgetting of all existence, a falling silent of our being, in which we feel as if we have found everything.