Wundervölker, Monstrosität und Hässlichkeit im Mittelalter (German Edition)

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New Seller. Expand your business to millions of customers Sell this item on Snapdeal. Sold by. Sell on Snapdeal. Explore More Personal Growth Books. In Same Price. Easy Return Policy. Help Center Got a question? Look no further. This paper explores the impacts of emotional intelligence and spirituality on workplace effectiveness, presents several theoretical models examining possible linkages among these variables, and, finally, presents several ideas for future research deriving from the models.

You may already have access to this article. Please Log in to check access. Previous Article. Next Article. Downloads: The fulltext of this document has been downloaded times since Your Access Options. Existing Customer You may already have access to this article. And then, heaven forbid, we may have to change. Your old eyes adjust to a new world, and you become more creative and discerning.

It is a philosophy says Asacker. Heart, then head. More at: IAmKeats. Surveys show that while some 40 percent of us make them, only 8 percent of us keep them. We may feel exhilarated when we set a big goal, but that soon gives way to anxiety. There is a way to set goals and achieve them. He did it by getting his pitchers to scale back their goals from lofty to bite-sized, from outcome to process. Instead, Rick refocused his pitchers on short-term, bite-sized process goals. He has to concentrate on hitting that glove.

Hitting the glove on a high percentage of pitches is also the most probable path to achieving larger, outcome-oriented individual and team goals. How It Translates We can all learn to refocus on hitting that glove. Whatever numbers they produced last year, they no longer matter. Time to prove yourself all over again. Many sales organizations try to motivate their sales forces with talk of raising the bar and hitting even bigger numbers.

But that lofty-goal approach can trigger fear and worry instead. Just like pitchers, salespeople know there are parts of the sales game beyond our control. By focusing on having daily, high-quality interactions with customers, I would make great progress toward putting a dent in my quota. Thinking about how many high-quality interactions I should have each day, I set the initial target at two. Before you laugh and ask what I was going to do after lunch, consider the math.

Two high-quality interactions per day are 10 per week, and 40 per month. As soon as I started focusing on my new simple, short-term, bite-sized process goal — two high-quality interactions with customers each day — I began thinking about my day differently. I began prioritizing those two high-quality interactions with customers above everything else. I wasted less time. Focusing on that one small change brought about big results. Gratitude encourages, clarifies, motivates, includes, and unifies. But gratitude is good for you too.

Gratitude puts you in the right mindset to lead. Gratitude and humility are interconnected. They reinforce each other. We alone are not responsible for who we are and what we do and that is the essence of leadership. We are never truly self-sufficient. In a practical way, gratitude provides guardrails in our life.

Gratitude helps us to protect from ourselves. It is amazing how much gratitude plays into avoiding poor behavior and wrong thinking. Gratitude sets a boundary on our thoughts by making us mindful of others. It helps us to avoid going where we should not go because we are more self-aware. Gratitude requires that we slow down and reflect.

Gratitude is the basis of emotional intelligence. It puts other people first. It says you know and you care. While empathy has been found to be essential to leadership, empathy is not empathy if it is silent. It must be expressed. Gratefulness helps to curb unproductive emotions such as frustration, resentment, and revenge. Studies have shown that it is an antidote to depression. It has the power to heal and move us forward. It improves relationships and is a remedy to envy and greed.

Instead of trying to strive with others we are thankful for what they do. Grateful people find more meaning in life and feel more connected to others. In these changing and uncertain times, gratitude is a leaders ally. Life is a continuum. Gratitude allows a leader to appreciate where they are and the resources they have at their disposal to face what life throws at them. A habit of gratitude gives us perspective.

More than a behavior it must come from the heart. It must be the mindset we lead from, manage from, and make decisions from. Gratefulness is grounded in reality because ultimately we must realize that everything good in our life is a gift. Leadership begins and ends with gratefulness. The ability to produce at an elite level , in terms of both quality and speed. To produce tangible results that people value. Cal Newport bases his book Deep Work on the Deep Work Hypothesis : The ability to perform deep work is becoming increasingly rare at exactly the same time it is becoming increasingly valuable in our economy.

As a consequence, the few who cultivate this skill, and then make it the core of their working life, will thrive. Learning is an act of deep work.

Sadhguru - emotions are the strongest aspect of your life

An act of intense focus. We are what we focus on and that is increasingly, the superficial. Shallow work adds to our sense of meaninglessness. There is the Monastic approach that eliminates or radically minimizes shallow obligations. The Bimodal approach that suggests binging on deep work for various lengths of time.

The Rhythmic approach makes deep work a habit by scheduling a regular chain of deep work in your day. The last approach and the one Newport prefers, is called the Journalistic approach. Using this approach you fit deep work wherever you can into your schedule.


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This last approach however, requires a great deal of willpower and practice. The Rhythmic approach may work best to get you started. Take Breaks from Focus Make deep work a priority by taking breaks from focus, not from distraction. Be Intentional with Your Time Have a plan for your day.

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If you start your day with blocks of deep work scheduled in, you stand a much better chance of actually getting some deep work done. A deep life is a good life. But a growing feeling of disappointment overwhelmed him. Rush from one meeting to the next, have too many emails to answer on any given day. There are moments when it seems all we do is fly by the seat of our pants. Yes, every aspect of our work rhythms conspires to throw us off-center! Staying grounded feels like the impossible dream.

I used to train actors. Actors study the art of being in the optimal state of mind. Well, you are the actor in your own life, and your life will unfold with more grace the moment you master some of the same skills. We tend to call them anchoring techniques. Here are a few of my favorites. Beware — what works well for one person will not work as well for another. Self-Talk: Affirmations have become the stuff of satire.

Too bad. To the cynic, an affirmation may seem too good to be true. Truth is, when you find an affirmation that works for you, the result DOES feel too good to be true! When I feel tired and showing up tired is not an option : I am a vibrant vehicle of light and love. The three keywords — vibrant, light, love — are high energy words for me. They resonate deeply.

Faith & Chemo – Life at the intersection of faith, nature, history and art

It shifts my energy, every time. I repeat it to myself, quietly, for about 30 seconds. Combined with a few deep breaths, it activates the cellular energy within me and around me that I am seeking to access. Do not use MY affirmation. Find the words that affirm YOUR highest good within you. Repeat them quietly. Instantly anchored! Sensory Reprogramming: Mental worry tends to get us unhinged, and classic anchoring techniques shift us away from the mind, back into our optimal states of being.

Visualize the sensory details of this place. Calm will return quickly. An anchoring technique, applied with quiet commitment, invokes a powerful inner shift within 30 seconds. Make them a daily habit. And reap your anchoring rewards. Our environment triggers behaviors or responses in us. When to Cooperate and When to Compete. What Are Your Hidden Strengths? Your strengths will get you in the door, but to make progress you are going to have to become more of who you are and draw on your hidden strengths.

Hidden strengths are not weaknesses. They are capacities you have that have yet to be recognized, developed and utilized. They become your Learned Strengths. Your strengths and weaknesses need to be managed. Strengths need to be managed so that they are not overused or overbearing. Often they can be delegated. But the area between the two—your hidden strengths—not only provide a deep pool of strengths to draw on but they will help you to smooth out your rough edges and bring into balance your natural strengths.

Is it Time to Disrupt You? Disruption can be a powerful and positive force. If we are to work with and take advantage of the disruptions in the world around us, we must be willing to disrupt ourselves. Return on Character We live in an age where wisdom is only wisdom if it is supported by numbers. There are two obvious problems with this. First, we miss a lot because we are looking for immediate return. And so it puts our focus on the wrong things. And secondly, as a result, we tend to assign value to things in terms of numbers.

It is assumed that if it gives us the best numbers, it must be the best choice or behavior. Nevertheless, it is satisfying when the numbers do add up. The 5 Choices to Extraordinary Productivity The 5 Choices is a nuts and bolts solution to greater productivity. To improve the situation we have five choices to make in three areas : Decision Management, Attention Management, and Energy Management.

This is really the foundational choice to make. Too often we get caught up in Quadrant 4 spending time or too much time on the trivial things that contribute nothing to our life. Q1: The Quadrant of Necessity. Q3: The Quadrant of Distraction. They are confusing motion with progress, action with accomplishment. These are activities that are neither urgent nor important.

When we get burned out we often go here for escape. If we stay too long, we can experience depression and even despair.


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These are that activities that will make a real difference in terms of accomplishment and results like proactive work, achieving high-impact goals, creative thinking, planning, prevention, relationship building, learning, and renewal. But you have to make a conscious choice to operate in this quadrant. Identify your roles. Organize accordingly. The five energy drivers are adequate movement, proper diet, sleep, relaxation, and positive social connections. Your brain is your number-one asset in a knowledge-work world.

Fuel it properly. Are You Uncomfortable? The Ten Golden Rules of Leadership. Do You Have Moxie? They are tough on the outside but soft on the inside. When knocked down they know how to get back up and they can bring others with them because they are likeable. They have a passion for what they do and have a need to make a positive difference in the lives of others. They have ambition and want others to share in it. They know how to pick themselves up after a fall.

Street Smarts. They know how the world works and what makes people tick. Baldoni breaks moxie down into five characteristics that you can practice and develop to be a leader that demonstrates moxie. Each characteristic is brought to life through the examples of leaders who have demonstrated it in their own life and leadership. The first is Mindfulness. Second is Opportunity. She is motivated by a desire to make a positive difference. Third is X-Factor. She has the persevering spirit that radiates resolve.

Leaders with the X-Factor are humble, and their humility attracts others to them. These can all be examined and improved. In addition, look for opportunities to improve through more training and consider taking on responsibilities that stretch you. Fourth is Innovation. Sometimes you need to take risks. That means thinking differently, doing differently, and rewarding others who do the same. They are tuned to the future. That gives rise to innovation. They are focused on making a positive difference in their teams and in their organizations.

Preparing and developing yourself now sets you up to make better decisions when you do get knocked down. Moxie is full of great stories and examples making it immediately relatable and practical. It is structured so that you can thoughtfully and tactically look at each of these areas to see where you can better prepare yourself. Baldoni also provides an appendix that works as a handbook to guide you in this.

Questions, examples, additional thoughts and action steps help you access where you are at and what you might need to do next. Moxie is not just about your work life, it also impacts every other aspect of your life and positively influences the lives of those you touch. Leadership Impact: Where it Comes From Why do some leaders make an impact, while others flounder after initial success? How to Find Leadership Blindspots. The 12 Rules of Respect. How to Discover Your What. What Keeps Leaders Up at Night? Balance: The Business—Life Connection.

Self-leadership is fundamental to good leadership, but it is not the end-game. Self-awareness for self-awareness sake has a limited value. Through introspection and reflection we can get to know a great deal about ourselves—as far as we know. The problem is that we don't know what we don't know. Only when we are able to test our assumptions about ourselves, can we know if we are getting it right. It is when we see ourselves in relation to others and in relation to a higher purpose that we really begin to clarify and many times even identify our core values, beliefs and intentions.

We can all know who we think we are, but it isn't until we get out and interact with others that we can begin to see where we are right and where we have been fooling ourselves. Who we are takes on meaning when it is in the context of our relationship with others. Superman's stance on "truth, justice and the American Way" is pointless if he remains isolated in his Fortress of Solitude. His values only have meaning in relationship to other people.

All the self-knowledge in the world counts for very little if it is not put to work in the service of others. Self-awareness that points to your unique contribution in the world is leadership. Who you are is leveraged when it is placed in the service of other people. Surely we must lead with integrity—in a manner consistent with who we are. However, the only way to know if we are really doing that is by looking at how we impact the lives of others—how our leadership is experienced by others. Self-awareness provides the opportunity for us to close the gap between who we think we are or want to be and who we actually are at a particular point in time.

But that can only be achieved with feedback of some kind. It's a book about trust in leadership and the trust that is generated by knowing who you are and leading as that person. At thirty-five, I was already an executive vice president with Turner Broadcasting, overseeing two divisions and reporting directly to the second most senior executive who soon would be named the company's CEO. I believed that I was very much at the top of my game, already delivering a lot of high-level presentations, and getting consistent positive feedback.

I was more than a little offended by the suggestion that I needed any help at all with my communication skills. But I went. In Atlanta, I participated in Speakeasy's exclusive, invitation-only workshop for C-suite executives. Called "The Leader's Edge," this intense three-day workshop focused on communication style and delivery with respect to leadership.

In spite of my initial resistance, I did my best to participate without revealing my conviction that I felt superior to this target audience that needed help with communication and presentation skills. I wasn't the least bit nervous when it came time to watch the video recordings of our individual presentations. I was sure I'd done just fine. With the others in our group, I watched as the executive persona of Scott Weiss delivered his speech from the screen. The guy up there looked pretty good. Very sure of himself. Very corporate.

Very buttoned up. I expected to be told, as I always had been before, that I was a very effective presenter. But after a moment, Sandy Linver, the faculty leader who had directed our session turned to ask me a question. Very confident. If you could separate yourself from this person and experience him objectively, would you want to hang out with a person like that on the weekend?

But I looked at that person frozen on the TV monitor and thought about it. Reluctantly, I had to tell the truth. I was. I had just admitted that the person I was projecting was not someone to whom I could relate. He wasn't even someone I really liked! And apparently, I wasn't the only one to be put off by Scott Weiss's executive persona.

In our remaining time together, other members of the audience began to offer more specific impressions of how they had experienced me as a communicator, and as a person. Not real. Those were just some of the terms they used. I had never heard myself described this way before.

I felt like the emperor with no clothes. I had not gone to Speakeasy for a consciousness-raising experience. But I sure had one. In the weeks following that close and uncomfortable encounter with my own executive persona, I did a lot of thinking. I examined what I had learned about how others actually did experience me, and thought about how I wanted people to experience me. There was a gaping abyss between those two extremes, and I realized that I had a lot of work to do to bring them closer together—to become more congruent as an individual and as a leader.

I needed to find my authentic self and learn how to bring more of my real personality to my vocation. I appreciate Scott Weiss sharing this story, for it's not just a process all growth oriented leaders must go through, but a process we must seek out continuously. Feedback is a process that, if we allow it, will keep us honest with ourselves. We see things as we are; and we see ourselves through our intentions. Feedback gives us a reality check that we are free to accept or reject, but without it we have no way to combat our own self-deception.

We must be able to experience ourselves in relation to other people if we are to have a genuine understanding of who we are and why we do what we do. So the place to begin if we truly want to know ourselves is to reflect on the impact that we have on others. Only then can we lead authentically knowing that our inner being is congruent with our outer behavior. Self-awareness is vital to the development of a leader.

But it's not navel-gazing. It is not an inward focus. It is an outward focus. Its ultimate goal is to improve our connection and effectiveness with others. The self absorbed leader struggles with self-awareness and emotional intelligence because self-awareness is about how we are perceived by others. It's about understanding how our behaviors are affecting other people. And we just can't do that by focusing on ourselves. It is easy for us to focus on ourselves—to think people just don't understand us.

And when we do, we tend to rationalize rather than grow. Explain rather than listen. Disconnect rather than lead. Self important leaders can't see how they are sabotaging themselves because they focus on their needs and feelings and not those of their followers. Consequently, they don't encourage feedback because it never seems relevant to them.

Faith & Chemo

An inward focus dooms us to operate from a place of weakness—never able to see what is holding us back. It is in the character of great leaders to have a great appetite for feedback. It's a gift and still the best way to gain an awareness of ourselves. You might think of it as a personal scorecard.

To see where we need to grow, we need to see how we affect other people. Only then can we begin the introspection that will lead us to a deeper understanding of ourselves and learn to move past unproductive thinking and develop new behaviors. How to Make Better Decisions "Why do we have such a hard time making good choices?

We often just go with our gut. And that hasn't always served us well. We tend to define our choices too narrowly and see them in binary terms. We miss other options. Confirmation Bias. We develop a quick belief about a situation and then seek out information that confirms our belief. When we want something to be true, we look for reasons to justify it. Short-Term Emotion. Our emotions paralyze our decisions. We think we're working it out, when all we have really done is kick up "so much dust that we can't see the way forward.

We think we know more than we actually do. We can't shine a spotlight on areas when we don't know they exist. As it turns out, most of the "decisions" we make do not involve any real choice. They are whether-or-not, yes-no decisions. We do not even consider other choices. Like a teenager, we "get stuck thinking about questions like 'Should I go to the party or not? A more enlightened teen might let the spotlight roam: 'Should I go to the party all night, or go to the movies with a few friends, or attend the basketball game and then drop by the party for a few minutes?

And consider asking others who have "been there done that. Encourage constructive disagreement. Consider the opposite. Consider the "outside view"—the averages. If possible, run small experiments to test our theories. Attain Distance Before Deciding. How about 10 months? How about 10 years? Also, identify and stick to your core priorities. Perhaps the most powerful question for resolving a personal decisions is, "What would I tell my best friend to do in this situation?

We have to stretch our sense of what the future will bring—both good and bad. Think about the extremes. The future is not a "point"—a single scenario that we must predict. It's a range. Set a tripwire: "We will act when…" a predetermined set point occurs. Making better decisions is a choice. This process will help us to make better choices. Are You a Giver or a Taker? Learning the Wrong Lesson. Fred 2. Fred exemplified an attitude of exceptional service delivered consistently with creativity and passion in a way that values other people. The problem is we view struggle as a negative. But struggle is how we grow.

Where Winners Live. If I did that, if I was good to my family, true to my friends, if I gave back to my community or to some cause, if I wasn't a liar, a cheat, or a thief, then I believed that should be enough. We begin with values that drive our behavior based on intrinsic rewards. But over time, something can happen if we are not careful. Competitive pressures weigh on us. The chance for extrinsic rewards like money and power loom larger.

First change your thinking. The behavior will follow. It all starts with a thought. How to Avoid the Artificial Maturity Trap. Feedback Can Be Fun. You According to Them. They have limited our responses. And it profoundly affects our ability to adapt. Behaviors and Mindsets that Ruin Careers. Leadership by Choice. Influencing Up. The Titleless Leader Leading without a title is about taking personal responsibility.

We—the world—is in desperate need of people who will choose to lead whenever and wherever they can. People are frustrated, angry, disillusioned, tired, and afraid. Not to mention skeptical, cynical, and distrustful.

Emotional branding

And those plaques touting people as the most important asset should be taken down. Not everywhere, of course, but in far too many organizations. But we have a choice. No one needs to appoint you, promote you, or nominate you. You decide. What Russell is talking about here is a different kind of leadership that starts with what all good leadership begins with: self-discipline. It is taking responsibility for the outcomes in your area.